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Tako Tako Talks
Tako Tako Talks

Season 1, Episode 1 · 4 months ago

#1 Just The Slightly Selfish Keats

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Our first podcast is about a letter by Keats to Benjamin B, showing the perpetual relevance of imagination and how it influences expression and writing.

The host Ravroop Kaur and Guruvinayak Singh Budhwar take it upon themselves to further understand how the romantics poet and writers like John Keats influenced the Romantic Era and how the texts are still relevant in our present society and impact an individual emotionally as a medium to find oneself immersed and inspired by beauty and image to self heal.

Hi, welcome to Tako. Tako talks, a podcast where coy and I. E. D we will dissect extracts from literary art of all shapes and sizes and style and today the style. It's like literary are from the garden. I wouldn't call him God like, one of the most important people in my opinion. John Keats, the most romantic poet of all times, precisely, and he has written a rather interesting and I would even say self centered later to his friend Benjamin Bailey on twenty two of November, Eighteen, seventy. Oh my God, I remember date's now. That's near good. So okay. So, so the preface of the later D is about imagination and more imagination, like that's the extract that I've taken out. Is it is, like that is the paragraph that you've selected, a specific extract that you've liked and you would like to discuss that precisely because if we start talking about entire books and late letters, that this podcast would never so it seems like a very long letter. It is. It is and they're gonna be other parts of it which really referred to off later once I'm done reading. So okay, I'm going to start without wasting everybody's more time. Yeah, I am certain of nothing but the holiness of the heart's affection and the truth of imagination. When the imagination seas, is as duty, must be truth, whether it existed before or not. For I have the same idea of all our passions as of love. They're all in the sublime creative of essentially dauty in a world. You may know my favorite speculation by my first book and the Little Song I think in my last, which is a representation from the fancy of the probable mode of operations in these matters. The imagination may be compared to Adam's dream. He avoke and found the truth. I am more zealous in this stut share because I have never yet been able to perceive how anything can be known for the truth by the confecutive reasoning. And yet it must be. It can be that even the greatest philosophers arrived at the school without putting a fine numerous objections. However, it may be or life for a sensation rather than thoughts. It's a vision in the form of the youth, a shadow of reality to come, and this consideration has for the comments to be for it has come as obsiliary to another favorite really official enjoy our...

...sins hereafter by having what we got happiness on earth to be. They can find it at such faith and all those who delighte co sensation rather than hunger, as you do after because I was like reading and doing the list of it. You can so Adams Stream. Basically, keiths is describing that his the way, his writing process. That comes from his imagination as a poet. It gives him the content that Adam like Adam's dream, like Adam Dream, was physical and mental peace, being in paradise physically, both physically examically. So that is what he means by the truth of imagination. Understand you know, and like. Why? The reason that I actually liked this letter and read it further. So I do not know if people notice this, but he capitalizes in a very interesting manner. So I'm not if John Keats had anything to do with the Germans, but in the German language we often capitalize a lot, not only the nouns. We capitalized like almost everything, like the first word of almost all words. I don't remember the exact grammatical rule because it's a while back I learned German, but so he capitalizes words like beauty, heart, and he just and I'm not sure why it seizes my heart, but you know, because he refers to beauty like he sees is, as beauty must be truth. Here beauty is considered as a noun and it, like he says, a thing of beauty is joy forever. Exactly. It's a kind of a personification, personalization of every world. The way he does it is very, very interesting, example words, but he gives a crality to words exactly by just capitalizing the first letter and it's, it's I mean it goes against the like the modern drama rules, but it is something which I like. That was the reason why I got into this to begin with. And Yeah, so that's it. Like that's why I...

...wanted to as so can I tell you, because I read this whole para that you said beforehand. So I really like the way he says, well, about talks about the Adam dream and he says that you have never for example, he mentions but, as I was saying, the simple imaginative mind may have its rewards in the repetition of its own silent working, coming continually on the spirit with a fine suddenness exactly. And Yeah, so I like it and as and as a painter myself, like why I wanted to talk about it, because, you know, this suddenness, this dream and Um, I don't remember who the philosopher was who said I think, therefore I am and you don't like I don't remember. I do remember who. I'm going to look them up. Yeah, I think it was a Frenchman, therefore reny the craft. So he coined the Stumm, I think, therefore him, though I believe both are very separate, and then maybe we can read about him later and have an episode. And so, you know, there's this thing of how imagination creates and like as a Hindu, and there's this Um parallel understanding of the hindle, like the creation of the world. So it's like there was once a tree and three leaves fell from the tree, those three being the holy Tabish Mahesh. One of those leaves had a thought that they can be a world. The thought created the world. Thus from imagination. That's the imagination kicks in. Exactly, imagination of a falling dead leave the city. It is a seed to a plant or a big tree. Not even the say that exactly. It's like from my understanding it. But like, if a leaf can imagine this intricate world, imagine what...

...we can imagine and create. Like, where do the possibilities even end when a dry leaf can think and create a world and become like the God of it? So basically, you mean this, this imagination helps us discover things that are there, but we haven't discovered them yet, but we need to. Through our imagination, imaginative mind, we're able to consolidate those things, give them a form exactly. There's already a form, but they're out there somewhere, but we need to give the form of physical name exactly, and that is where imagination kicks and so if you can imagine it, yes, it has already happened. Very Nice, very interesting, very interesting. His concept of imagination does really ring a Belvet. What words what talks about imagination? That it is spontaneous overflow of emotion. Precisely, okay. And so yeah, so there's that. And you know, it just gives this immense power to US creatives. You know, we imagine and we create. It's creativity calls, creativity calls and it's it's a godliness like. That's how I personally interpreted and like, if you read the entire litter, it's actually a little funny because in the beginning he starts to talk about the fear of poor crips, crisps like a friend of there's a mutual friend or something. I'm not sure because I do not remember what he read, but I know like he was like I should write to Chrism and refist him to tell me whatever. So that's about Chris, and now let me talk about my imagination. It was a little sife. That's why you say that he's a little selfish. Exactly, a little selfish because, you know, he starts to it's nice that he talks about the health of a friend, and then it's more interested in talking about something more vague, something more romantic, instead of like you know already. It also shows how passionate he is about his work and what his new find is about imagination, about all of this. So he really can't stop himself, but he's so brimming with it that he has to let it out exactly. You know, it's like how it toddles, like...

...all right, I really don't care what what's wrong with your what's happening with you? This is what I want and that's how it's going to be. And it's a slight selfish, but I like it. I like the selfishness, selfishness of the Creator. There's something wrong with my time today? No, it's that's fine, but here I read another thing that I really like. What he mentioned. Is it okay if I say it? Yeah, so he says. Do you not remember forming to yourself the single space more beautiful than it was possible? And yet, with the elevation of the moment, you did not think so. I'm continually running away from the subject. Sure what? This cannot be exactly the case with the complex mind, one that is imaginative and at the same time careful of its fruits, who would exist partly on sensation, partly on thought, to whom it is necessary that ears should bring the philosophic mind, so the one I consider yours, and therefore it is necessary to your eternal happiness. It's wow, that's that's that's a nice thought. That's about night, the way he's connected it to happiness in the end, that's a very good thought. Yeah, and it's just, you know, amusing of tragedy, tears, and since now, in the future, we know how his life plays out, how he dies. He dies pretty young. He Dis I think when he was seven. That's an imagine all the work he's written so many centuries ago and he's still so popular and well connect with. Keep to the present day, where we're more technological, there's more technology, and that you don't meet many poets and writers as much as you would use technology or listen to them as much. But look, his words still makes sense. They do. And it's interesting how technology is making the romantics even more romantic than before, while they absolutely hated blood. Exactly. And Yeah, so, and move over, like why...

I got into this letters. So I like I was going through my depression. No, I wouldn't call it the depression, but you know, just like a sad phrase and the common hormonal teenage free stuff. And at that time I came across this line, I believe I threw this line at you in a different wording, at when people having a private conversation, that if I am in such temperament, if I'm to find myself at the bottom of the lake, I will not make the effort to jump up. So, yes, you remember that right. So that was something that resonated with me and I can still sit to an extent. Still does, though. Yeah, so, yeah, and like I was actually trying to find that specific litter and I was not able to. It is also addressed to Benjamin Bailey, but I could not, like I still could not find it, and I stumbled across upon this one and it was actually not that. What is the word delarious? Yeah, it wasn't that delirious to read this and like I wanted to follow in sadness by reading this. Basically, it kind of give you a sort of comfort. It's something to lean on exactly, and that's nice, because it started talking about imagination and I was like, oh my goodness, instead of you know, so this letter has a separate place. So, basically, when he writes about his internal feelings or what internally he's going through, and you can connect with that, it's really amazing that these words are written so many years ago, these words of the past, and are comforting somebody in the future exactly, and that is your present. That's that. That's nice and it is also very interesting. Feels and words writers a heat. When you read these things, they don't heal you, they do hear you. They give you comfort because, and you know, I was just thinking. We, the modern man is like, Oh my God, it's no better than everybody's. Give me, don't say modern man.

The model of the term has modern person. Yes, the modern person. I'm so sorry. You know the ginger, Ginger, Ginger. There's something wrong with my mom to it. Yeah, some alogies to eat something today. No, I did not. I just had what did I eat in the morning? I've forgotten. I ate peace. I don't know what peace are. Nice. Okay, anyway, what was I saying? Yes, the modern person. We just accept that we are better, that we are more evolved, but in the end our mental status as bad as that was during the plague. But I mean there's still a plague going on. So it's we're similar in that, I suppose. No matter what air you are in, whatever you're going through internally, it can happen to anyone at any time and any space in a parent you know was if there is, I don't know, but interesting how words live on forever and this still makes sense, precisely. And Yeah, so the modern person is not some modern after or tell me what a poem of Keiths do you love the most? I actually do not remember. I really don't because I actually do not remember which poem of Keiths I like. I I on a person note. I do not like John Keats's poems as much as I do like William Bird's Word Beau. Would you like his letters? Right, I liked his letters. I like this letter in isolation a lot, to be very honest, and there's something wrong with me in the sense that, you know, Um, I do not find myself feeling passionate about things I cannot tangibly manifest, if that makes any sense. I am I've never been a fan of a writer, a pot thing and start. Even if I love a series, even if I love, like absolutely madly, truly deeply in love with some thing...

...which is like abstract, an expression of somebody's I will appreciate the art, and I know this is very controversial and very wrong on my part, but I will appreciate the art they create. But it's very rare that I appreciate the artist because, as an artist myself, that makes sense. Art For Art's sake. Yeah, I and then a lot of people are like you should put because nowadays artists a basically bag of graphs. A lot of times so they say that you need to look into the artist when you're looking sharing their art, because you will make the artist benefits from the art. But I could if I like a specific art. I really do not go dive into reading more from the same person. If I am to come across something similar by them, amazing. If I'm not, then it's fine because I have done this with some isolated writers, such as Dan Brown and the person who wrote gone good, I guess, Jill Jin Flynn. I've seen the movie movie. So there's a book called it's based on. I believe they have written three books. I'm not sure about the pronouns if I saw the movie before. So I've not seen the movie. I've read the book and better bookause she had three books. I'm not there. He she whatever. So we'll go with there because we should use there now. You really like the book. I really liked the books and I even gave lended one of those books to somebody and I could never retrieve it. But it's a grand fund of the time. So yeah, that was my letter and what I wanted to present. That's it from my said. Do we want to add something? Harry? This reminds me of his two of his poems that I really like. One is a thing of beauty, the joy forever beauty, and another one I'm reading that that is one of my most favorite books. I read that bomb by John Keats when I was very small. I was in school, I think, but that point somewhere. It has stuck with me and I like his poem or to a nighting and that is good.

The frog one, right, no, no, no, no, no, no, it's a different one, like we're in the frog makes the nightingale. So by, no, no, no, that's by another poet. That's yeah, so. And actually there's a third one also, or to a grassion one. That is one of my most favorite also. So these three I really like. And then there are a few more romantic writers like college and what's worth, solitary reaper. I really like that poem. But yeah, these Romantics, I think they were at a different place and they really changed the concept of imagination. They didn't and they brought, I think, more of I tality to poetry. They made it more musical, they made their they never quit, they never specificity, they never go like, okay, we have to be specific to their poetic diction. They made our own rules and they expressed them to an expression imagination, spontanity. That's what I like about Romantics and that's what I love about kids, and I think this letter completely explains exactly exactly. So I guess this would be it for it, and maybe we can have all those poems as we go with the future episodes. And this is it for one of our, let's call this the pre recorded one for yes, yes, so this is one of our, I guess, the try episodes, and this say is you know, the listener, dear listener, you're gonna most PROV listen to this, because I'm impressed by us. I'm not gonna thank you so much for your time and your wonderful company. Tom also you ours, of course, and to demand thank you for bringing such a nice extract here, something that we discussed. I think I feel better because we took it on very different levels. We took it at a physical level about the writing of the poetry, how imagination in particular, and then we took it to a level of how...

...mentally it affects and what people go through. In a way, it was very self heeling. So I'm really happy and also just run thing. Listeners, if you hear this, noice. Nobody's getting beaten. We when we talk, we use a lot of our hands and we just keep on hitting things left and right. Oh my God, I asked you not to do it. I think I was so immersed in the conversation that I don't realize exactly. I thought I should tell that I've alreadalid that way. I when so okay before, because it's really appropriate movie people. We should stop. Yes, okay. Thank you so much, our dear listeners, and we should catch up with you again on our next segment, on next podcast, and have a good, beautiful, Wonderful Day. Taka Tacko.

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