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Tako Tako Talks
Tako Tako Talks

Season 1, Episode 5 · 4 months ago

#5 People are Dada, Dada is Dada.

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This Episode is the continuation of Tristan Tzara manifesto as our hosts dig deeper into the dadist poem and diction by picking out tmthe dadaist poems which they found intriguing. They try to give a read, but more like end up shouting out the poetry. They have both named the female dada poets and writers who were important namely Jean Arp, Beatrice wood and more.

At the end of the Podcast they formulated their own fun conception of dada- as it all dada, as dada is nothing and everything. Dada is dada

Hi Everyone, welcome to Taka Taka talks. This is eady and this is coy, as I'm popularly known, and Taco Tako talks is the podcast where we dissect, interpret, read, extracts or entireties of different literature and talk to you guys about everything, as we discussed amongst ourselves. Uh. And if you guys remember, last time we were discussing data's manifesto and because of our listeners, they requested us to have a part second and so we will be discussing about it further today. And so today, Tom and me we have put together a couple of poems and we're going to discuss before we start the poems. Firstly, Tomma will share how you actually you're supposed to go about it, to make because data poems are also sound poetry. It's a form of sound poetry. So there's specific ways and not exactly rules, but certain things that you need to keep in mind while you're writing a sound poetry. and Um, the second more interesting thing about witchild tell second. So this is this was in the manifesto number seven by Tristan Dasa. We well, we talked about the first manifesto, the previous time and he was published and it first quoted. To make anotherst poem, it says, take a newspaper, take a pair of scissors, choose from the newspaper and article or sufficient length that you intend to give to your poem. Cut out the article, then carefully cut out each cut out each one of the words which make up this article and put them into a bag. Shake gently, then take out each cutting one after the other, copy them out consensually in the order in which they came out of the back. This poem will be like Que...

...and here you will have a writer was infinitely original, with the charming sensibility, even though it's must misunderstood by masses. Very interesting. Violet is interesting something which is even more interesting to note that in the same manifests staff to talking about this, Christ trustian was like anybody who would make a poem like this is an absolute stupid person, basically, and he said that never he would sully his own artwork or his own poetry to use such a method to write poems. So it's a little hypocrital, it's a little I believe he's just saying it for the sake of saying it, to involve more people into the others, and this basically is maybe he's being satirical. Also, what his intention is? So, like a lot of historians things that he never used this method in writing. Yeah, I don't think he used I think he used words and jargons and you know, he was a little Um. He's sequiturs in between his writing intentionally, and I think those examples the language was very intentionally. So maybe it's just the way for to involve people, to track people. Maybe you're writing that way. And while you were saying this, I just realized this episode in itself is going to be very bist, that is random and snature, because we have the utensils clanking, the airplane, airplane going around, this bird basically going bonkers with them not happy. I ate rust my life. We had trust my life. We are actually so happy. Right. Yeah, listeners, it's an Indian dessert m made for milk and milk flour or something. But I actually know how to make rust my lie at home. It's an end in version of ice cream. Right. No, Um, it basically is you take cheese, you put a little bit of flour in a very minute and then you Um. Basically, you're a chef Tama. No, not, not a shift. What is that word? What do you do to it? Do you need?...

You need the cottage cheese and a little bit of cottage cheese, cotta cheese, cotta cheese, a little bit of any flour, usually it's bread floor, and you put it onto the cotta cheese and you need it and it becomes a fine, fine paste. You let it sit. You take those, take that fine paste, and make do like circular balls or whatever shape you want out of it. You put it in boiling water. Yeah, and you put it in sweet boiling water such that it puffs up then into the flavored milk. Is Very tasty. It's very delicious and you have it cold. Just look up rust my lie and you will thank us for the rest of your lives. And it's very easy to make. To be honest, I never knew that. Back to US lies DA rust lizers data, it's life. So the first poem would be by Dy of Christian, DASA DASA. So why I chose this poem is because I'm in love with the title. The title is proclamation without pretension. Dear listeners, before I start, I don't know how to exactly read the data home. So please do not mind if I make any mistakes, or if you have anything to tell me, please come and blow and tell us how are we're actually supposed to go about it and let me know about the mistakes, such that I can drap it on her face. Oh, yes, yes, okay, other is going to sleep for a new world to be born. Art, Parrot, word replaced by data. But let's see, saw US or handkerchief? The talent that can be learned makes the poet a druggist. Today, the criticism of balances no longer challenges with resemblance. hypertrophic painters hypeer raise petty...

...sized and hypnotized by the hyacinths of the hypocritical looking. Muisans consolidate the harvest of exact calculations, hypodrome of immortal guarantees. There is no such thing as important. There's no transparence or appearance. Musicians smash your instruments, blind men take the stage. The syringe is only formal understanding, all right, because it is naturally exactly the way I pissed, the way I am sick. Art Needs and operation. Art is a pretension warmed by the timidity of Urinary Basin the Hysteria born in the studio. We are in search of foes. That is direct, pure, sober, unique. We are in search of nothing. We affirm the vitality of every instant, the anti philosophy of spontaneous acrobatics. Oh that, and you know, reading the dadaist phones. It's even it's it's a different kind of vibe before, lack of a better word, because you know you read it, you are suddenly in love with this. I don't know a politicianist I reading gives features like this in this way, because that is how the words have been highlighted. That's a capitalization. So I'm not sure if this is the correct way, but every time I was reading I was like, Oh, this world, you would I would never imagine this word being junk supposed with the next one. But I was like, okay, okay, what's next? What's next? And the coolest part about this is, for example, how he misspells museums. So music, if I'm like interpreting it right, as music, music, like it is supposed to be the word for musing in French. From what the paragraph...

...is like, hyper tropic painters hype erased, theticized and hyperpypnotized by the hyacinths of the hippocritical looking music. So it makes sense if we make if we call that museum, that it's the hypocritical museums which have made hyper hyprofect painters hype like those many for it's all data here, people. It's all data exactly. And you know, that is why I love these poems like they ring. I think after reading this, my voice, volume of my voice, the pitch, has increased, has it has? So Yeah, now mine I've actually forgot the name, for it is the great limit of obscurity. Three, and the reason I like this poem is because for a lot of times the poems that I write, yes, when I was younger, they used to be almost on the same lines in the way they are like singular, like longer sentence and short sentence and single single word and so on. So this form goes as where we love, the flowers of the clocks catch fire and the plumes encircle the brightness in distant sal for morning, the cows lick the salt lilies. My son, my son, let us always shuffle through the color of the world, which looks bluer than the subway in astronomy. We are to then. We have no mouths, are legs, are stiff and knocked together, our faces a formless like stars, crystal points without strength, turned basilica mad the zigzag, crack, telephones, bite, the rigging liquefy, the arc climbed astral memory towards the nords through its doable fruit. It's raw flesh, hunger, fire, blood. I like the ending. Hungry fire, very game of strong Zeno's. Yeah, so, like the reason I it's specific like this. I was touching my nose while...

...speaking. I thought it was making weird sounds. So the reason I absolutely love this boom is because violets, that is it also allows the listener, to the reader, to interpret it a little bit because, like, we have way too thin, we have no mouth. Sounds like how, as you said, in the present day nation of India last time, that the the artist is thin because they do not have a mouth. They don't get too expressed within here. So it kind of because there's left freedom of expression, although if you compare it now there is more comparatively, but in the past it hasn't been there. Yeah, that's why the art Indian NAT hasn't grown I mean the culture is there, the tradition is there. That's why a lot of people visit India to see the culture and tradition. But the art that they have has a lot, I feel a lot of yet is very always, to an extent has been religious oriented. For exact ample, in the romanesque renaissance, Romantics almost all. But if you go back to history, a lot of our art was destroyed the invasions, like whatever remains is religious. Half of it was destroyed, the sculptures their faces. Are they faced or something? All the other like if people to a city like Deli, it's around by monuments. All the sculptures are destroyed. Yeah, we don't have a lot of it left. That is, I believe, one of the saddest things about the invasions of Europeans. They loved destroying things. Even when Roman like a lot of Roman artwork was destroyed by the Christian missionaries because, true, this is how it is. Yeah, but it's not like there's in other Asian countries, for example China and Japan. They did not like the because the invaders maybe came from within the country. Yeah, I remember you were telling me about the Chinese dynasty so probably that is the reason, but I suppose they're very proud of the culture and they make sure that nobody destroys that. Precisely so, we were all so. But...

...it wasn't in a hand. It wasn't an ancestor's hands. I suppose perhaps it was. We would never know. We would never know. That's a thing of the past. Think of the past two and it was. It was after all, I think I'm going to fall in love with this world. Everything. It was the world. Data, everywhere for everything, anything. Yeah, make sure is going to get annoyed by it. WHO's man listeners? My husband. So now I'm going to test him with the word data. Anybody like to have tea? Yeah, and Dada being the grand word for grandfather, it makes even more sense, lack thereof. So can I tell what I like? The part? What I like? I like the line in the distance, cullfur morning, the cows, like the salt lilies. I can actually I can see that happening. For some weird reason, it was like my son, my son interesting. Yeah, and even with your art, you're I'm not saying that. What is what are we? A poem, the poem that you, without pretension, and you know how the very first time the player really is or the handkerchief. I don't know what that word means and I believe we should have looked that. It was an art part words replaced by Dalla. Now that I understand. I understand that now. Yeah, that makes sense. You know, that is like how a lot of presenter words, such as I yea trailer. So you need to read the entire book to know what is similarly with that that you need to read so much. Don't know what that that is, because that there is nothing. After all. You know this line musicians smash your instruments, blind men take the stage. I was watching some series and in that movie or a series, they've shown a bit of data. Now I feel that you're in that, because they're playing and the in the end,...

...when the song comes to an end, the lady playing the cello, she smashes it and the crowd looks like, Oh, like this. So she smashed, but it was more like she smashed it herself. Her own cello looks like and then she goes behind the curtain, gets a new Chilen and she sits again and then she continues playing. So it was all very dull. For me, it is very after all, and you know, like as you're talking about this, I would actually take this time to talk about one of the I talked about this yester yesterday in the lecture of us in the previous episode. That way, recorded just a little bit of it. It was an exhibition by marks on. It started on third of May and and was still third of June, depending. I don't remember the name of it. However, it had, it has very, very many curious things. For example, it Um the invitation they extended was called the pink pamphlet and it then write it users with, like the viewers, sorry, with a quotation saying the entry is free. Art is not. One second. Let me open the proper, proper document to specifically explain this. But other than that, what other things it encapsulated and it talked about was that there was one artist who put himself in a wardrobe, okay, and in the wardrobe for the people who came, he screamed random names at them, like literally at them. He just here comes this person, becomes that person, imagining entering an exhibition, and from sounds like that then Um, allegedly, some of them threw human skulls at the viewers. If you like a painting, a skull will come flying at you. Wow, that's why interesting. and Um, they invited certain artists who absolutely hated dad to the exhibition for...

...the sheer pleasure of it. When did this happen? This happened back in nineteen seventeen, really nineteen seventeen, eighties. and Um, then they had those skulls, were real human skulls. They want plastic sculls, according to some sources. Yes, whoa how did they get idea? And so, for me, if I think I would be in the time of Dada, I would be very scared, honestly. That is why people came in, because they were like spread a lot of fair also, and they spread a lot of anarchy, if that would be the right word, chaos, and like. This is where da that becomes even more important. So the invitation, as it called it, express cerealism, had to kicken. Yeah, because it had to mute out bladder a little bit. The ferocity of data. Yes, and data can be anything, so why not? And at the Pink Prospectus, it was called, it was crossed and half nonsensical, precisive tone entries free hands in pocket. The exited guarded painting under the arm. That's how they invited people. and Um, so in the cupboard was and that is he said things like attention his Adora Ducan, Louis will and different things like that. And then there was another like in the same exhibition in the likes, there was stage in the basement where the lights were turned off and artists would sit there in an unsided trapdoor and scream and veil for the people who are to come. That was the art exhibit. This happened in Soparai on drew Calbert, Paris, Paris, like at that time, they ended a bookshop for the exhibition, and this is Paris. France has been the center of a lot of it has political scandal. And when they when they launched, that therest moment, the phrase, you know, they...

...say when France Niezes, the whole of Europe catches fire. Exactly, because this is what translated. France school fired too, considering London burnt like how many times now? Yeah, so, Um, yes, that. And then there was also this another time, where I believe it was restaurant Tazer himself. Was said that Charlie Chaplain has become a daddst and he's going to come speak with us. So he lied, really he lied to attract people. People came in, and then the chaplain, then the artists. They started to mock the cloud for being stupid enough to imagine that Charlie Chaplain is going to come, and they made folly there in their little rally. They made civilians feel like little pieces of ships, for lack of a better word, and that was the rally. That was literally the aim of Dada Games and this pure rage, your rage, of the war, to be honest, is what I feel. Well, I suppose it's a wrap on data today. Data today. That sounds fun. No, yeah, it's wrap on data and if our listeners want us even more data. Yeah, yeah, we can absolutely talking about it. No, because there's a lot of literation. Yeah, and we were looking into a few paintings by different artists and the paintings actually very interesting, and I think some of your paintings are very data I do identify as a data service. Yeah, and if I was in an artistic community which was safe enough, I would have done I would have thrown skulls at people. That's maybe, maybe nonsense. Actually, human SCLASSIC. That don't hurt. That don't hurt. Or maybe, like you know, silicon as, we have holy coming up. People, you know, holy is the festival of colors in India and it's a fun festival. But you know what happens before holy? Like ten days, rainy days...

...before all the kids around you, wherever you're walking, any time, you can be shot with a balloon from anyway, from any direction, or an egg. It's very crazy out here because, like, if you're walking on the road, her kids there will be in the terrorists of their houses and they'll be throwing balloons at you. Random people will throw balloons at you. So be safe. Everyone, be safe. Yeah, and when he was talking about this, was some weird reason, I was watching a Korean show, which is very amazing, in which an eleven year old committed a crime and old and different committed a crime of throwing bricks at people's ended up killing one person. And like, I got somebody. I was in school. So somebody through a balloon on my face from I was sitting around the window seat. It felt like somebody slapped me across the face. It really hurts, it really hurts. So, slappy Dada, holy, happy, holy people and they'll see you later. That that go Oh da Da da day. Good bye,.

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