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Tako Tako Talks
Tako Tako Talks

Season 1, Episode 3 · 2 months ago

#3 Daddy issues Ft. Silvia

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Our third episode is an analysis of poem Daddy which is by Silvia Plath who wrote this confessional poetry and popularised the concept  where she has explored the effects of family bond, emotion and mental state and how pain is felt by everyone anywhere. Our hosts Ravroop Kaur and Koi take a back seat to peel out the psychological aspects of the poets life and coorelate it with topics such as Father Daughter relation, elektra complex, Victimized mentality, Depression, Nazi- German outlook and the Polik view, a rasist segregation which was prevelant during World War 2.

Hello listeners, welcome to talk, talk, talks podcast by me coy and I, and we talk about all sorts of Literary Arts in this podcast and we often forget, forget to do the introductions because that's how we are. So, yeah, that's it. You would you like to add something? I'll just ask you. So what are we discussing to day Toma? Today we are discussing Daddy. Seriously, sorry, we are discussing daddy by Sylvera plants. And, you know, somebody actually said that I can sensualize everything and when by reading it like that, by reading it like that, God, a lot of people are going to ban me from there. So this is actually, you know, interesting. I was going through literary critics of the poem and a lot of people, like I technically should have read the poem and then went ahead with this, but like just for the things. So they said that her using the word daddy is to show that some part of her is still a younger child who who has not Daddy, her daddy. So it's to show that, you know, like how this is the child of her has still survived with the trauma of the Dead Dyet, of the DAD dying early. She never got the opportunity to call out to her father use the word Daddy. She yeah, like he passed her when she was tin like she says in the point that he passed her when she was when she was ten. Happy, I did not cross your yeah, yes, and I finally found my groove to like, start reading the poem. So he has start. Do you want me to read it actually, like Dad, like I'm just gonna when never, she says, Daddy. I'm...

...just going to do it for the company. Yeah, so you do not do. You do not do any more. Black Shoe, in which I've lived like a foot for thirty years, poh in white, barely daring to breathe, or a chew. Daddy, I'm not going to Daddy. I have had to kill you. You died before I had time. MARV MARBLE, heavy, a bag full of God ghastly statue with one great toe as big as a Frisco seal. So well, this is interesting. You know how she like a black shoe which lived, which I have, in which I have lived like a foot. That is actually interesting because at the time, shoot, black shoes normally leather, and we all know how new leather is uncomfortable and what that does to your foot. So it's obviously uncomfortable and and I don't know this, this is this does not make sense, but I was reading, like I readed it, and I'm like, it's also very smallely for the foot to live in. It's a very gruesome description's given very a little it's like when you read poetry, usually you read very flowery stuff and all the uh, well, we know that Syria platism, like she deduced the confessional poetry. So, yeah, I know she's confessing, but it's it's very gruesome details, it's a little tourid and it's a little different. Yeah, and you know how she ends up comparing her dead father to like a marble, like a ghastly statue with like a big dough and for some weird reason this hit home to me because those are something which I see in people like I'm not sure why, maybe I'm the only one. And with one great to beg as a cross Cauzee, I can imagine how the width of the tough and how distasteful to the might look. I'm not...

...sure, but it kind of makes sense. And Yeah, and yeah, that's it. She does give a very pathetic pains, a very pathetic picture of her Daddy. You feel like, okay, she says for thirty years, poor invite, barely daring to breathe, or a true so it's like for thirty years. So that means she's thirty. So probably there's a time around when she committed suicide, because we know she was dealing with the depression this first four months before she come in. She wrote this four months before. Okay, so I think also tells us like what all she's reminiscing? She's remembering her father, she's going through some dilemmas of nostalgia. She's nostalgic, but her probably her mental state isn't all is on the decline. Of course, more likely, because she says, Daddy, I've had to kill you. He died before I had time for me, and that feels like she had to kill the idea of her father, which, like later, she wasn't an abusive relationship with her husband too. He's a animal animal writer, and there's a word for it, I forgot, but he wrote his poem poems were mostly based on animal yeah imagery and about animals, the crow or a few more. So he's a good poet. He's a good poet, but like, from what I've seen, that Um like. What I read, at least on her narrative, was that he would have been a little abusive towards her and that's where they separated. Could be. Yeah, I should have looked into that. We look into it later anyway. So moving on and ahead. In a freak in the Freakish Atlantic, where it pours being green over blue. So actually continent with the previous one ghastly statue with one great toe big as a Frisco seal and a head in the Freakish Atlantic where it pours being green over blue, in waters of the beautiful noset.

I used to recover, I used to pray to recover. You do so that's German, okay, in the German tongue, in a polished town scraped flat by the ruler of wars, wars, wars, but the name of the town is common. My polar friend, and this okay, I'm gonna read. My polar friends, says there it doesn't order too so I could never tell where you put your foot, your route. I never could talk to you. The tongue stuck in my jaw. So yet again she paints again now wrenching picture of her dead father and like, I'm not sure where it pours, being green over blue, like his head in the freakish at landed what she meant by that, but in my head it feels like, you know, being green is kind of rotting and it's like his death Wollen, rotten head found in the waters of Atlantic. That's the imagery. Is Very disgusting. Maybe it's I feel it's unapologetic. It's very harsh in a way, but it's a little scary. It is like it makes you unnerved because, you know, Um, what I feel is that, I believe we even discussed this a while back. A lot of times we just expect the family to be the ideal, us to like them because we're biologically predisposed to and whenever and like. Sue Me if I'm wrong, but I don't think anybody really likes their family in the end. Nobody can really like family like maybe I'm wrong, but you know, we are made to like them and then biologically have to like biologically you of your family and whenever that...

...thing like, you know, anybody writes out of that, it makes us a little had she written this for her husband most probably would have. We would have been fine with that. Yeah, yeah, but now that she's writing it for her dead father, who died at the age of ten, what audacity. But she's only ten, like, how much could she remember of her father? And why is she terribly dissecting his imagery like that and making him unlikable for herself so that she gets over him? Because, in a way, because I think it's less about painting the father in the wrong picture more about getting over the fact that he died when she was she didn't get much time with him. So, exactly, I rather not miss him, I'd rather hate him like crazy. I'd rather tarnish him precise and his head in the green blue water. And then, exactly, and like, she does like him because, you know, she praised to recover him and do that is like saying, Oh, you in a way, and I don't like it's like know, you like that craze for her, and she prays for him in the German tongue. Perhaps he like wishing for him in a Polish town which has been half German. I suppose she was half German years and she talks about how the wars have basically would have destroyed the town where this must probably be around Second World War. Yep, Ye, must have ended or something. Okay, and it's it's interesting because, you know, she talks to her polished friends and she uses the slow polack, which is actually considered derogatory. Yeah, and so, like Polish is the proper word to use. So she even refers to a friend in a like because, you know, it feels like she's also a little bit resentful of the French to have been off. No good use to find the town where her father would have been buried. Okay, so she says. Now, like the name of the town is common, common, my polit friends says, there are a dozen or two. So I could never tell where you put your your route, I could never talk to you. So she never got...

...the chance to know him really well. So where her father came from? What all the details that her parents would probably give their child, like hey, kid, this is my history. She never knew her father's history. Yeah, probably, when you hear your friends talk about their family, their ancestors. She never got a chance. Precisely, and that and but like she does call him a Nazi, like not a Nazi person, but like she compares him to a Nazi and like that's weird. That's really weird going. Maybe he was, but we wouldn't know. would be now, because like maybe we should have read more about his actual belongings. But it's like, I think her father wasn't Etomologists, so he wasn't into the army. But maybe because it was a time when, because of what happened in the Holocaust, or of Germans, they've got a lot of hate, especially the Nazis exactly. So maybe this is her another attempt to unlike, to make him unlikable. Father Exactly. And maybe he was just unlikable because maybe by the age of ten she knew that her father is her toxic bag. You never know, Y, yeah, and so, yeah, and then she says that she could never find him. Where he put his foot, where he puts his route, and then she says it's stuck in a barbed vibe snare. I could hardly speak. I thought every German was you and the language obscene. Now she seems she's really scared, yes, because she's not able to vocal like she's like it means eyes. So she's like she's trying to you know, she's stammering while she's writing in German and like she prays for her father in German, which kind of, like you know, contradicts. How could one pray in a language that they find, as she says, obscene? And she feels that every German man is her father, because she does not know her father in the end. So every German, every hour and every that person kind of shows that, okay, this is the father. And so yeah, and, like you know, and especially,...

...that is something which which hits to me because even when I when I was younger, I used to stammer a lot and I used to say Um, like while speaking and for and like my teachers and my friends made a lot of fun on that because they used to call me mango because in Punjabi Humbo is like mango, right. So they used to call me mango boy because because I used to stammer, so Um. So, when she says I can't understand that pain and and I can like it struck like a barbed bias snare. That makes more sense because you know when you stamm and not I will express to your father, who's dead, in the language that he spoke. It is that it makes because and you find the language wrong. Of course you do. So there's that, and then she continues and engine and engine, chuffing me off like a Jew, a Jew too, Schwitz, Belson, Belson. I began to talk like a Jew. I think I may very well be a Jew. The snow of tyrol, the clear beer of Vienna, and not very pure or true. With my Gypsy and sistress and my weird luck, my Tarot Tarot pack and my Tarot Pack, I maybe a bit of Jew. So maybe I was a mother, a Jewish woman. No, I think it is because her father. I don't know about that, but I think because probably it's like because her father is German. So she's either what I feel is from the like pup itallling. I think there's a maybe she had an abusive relationship, okay, and the what the Nazis? What happened with Jews. So she is I don't know why she's doing that, but she is a single pallel between her and Nazis, like the way, like her and her father's relation. She's Co relating it...

...to Nazis and Jews because she's joining a pallel that she's the Jew and her father's the Nazis. So the Pallet to being the victim, like Jews, with the victim in the Holocaust because of the Nazis. So she's joining that battle and correlating it to her relation with her father. So in a way it kind of tells it was. It was an abusive relationship. Then makes sense, like death and more. I'm just like looking up poor um her parents. So I don't think she I believe your hypers this is right and correct. I'll look into it more. Alright, we did'd some embronto research on Sylphire badges now and she was not a Jew. Right. So, so your hypers this is is correct in a way that it's a deliberate attempt, yeah, to like make yeah, it makes sense. You look ugly, make him look worse because, like the Nazis still data, are the greatest antagonists the humanity, like the recent history has seen. It's like she has a love hate relation with her father. She loves the she hates the way she wants, wants the father to be there, despite his presence and in her life, that she's missed his presence. Yeah, all right, and you know how she also, I really I read when I am at Tarogad reader, and it's the A R ot, but she says Tar Rock, which was interesting because I did not know that was also spelling because it's a Jew and like a Hebrew thing, right, more or less. So, yeah, it's it's nice, it's interesting. And you know, her weird luck given to her Gypsy and Sistress, which is which maybe her mother, because maybe she liked her mother a little bit more. And Yeah, so then she says, I've always been scared of you. Now this is...

...the first time she has referred to her father in a non German form. Okay, now she's saying you. Okay, I've been scared of you, with your luftwaff fill, your gobbled Google, your neat mustache, your and your iron eye, bright blue pants, a man pants, a man, oh you. I think I understand why. There's an rn eye concept that I will discuss further. But you tell me, what do you think? No, because like the Germans were, Nazis used to call themselves are and then that Hitler. Hitler was obsessed with being the Orient so I think till they I meet people who refer to something associated or to themselves or something like that. Oh you know what, some way we are related to ours. And I don't know, and the kind of history that they support in in it is so vague. It's the same with the Hitler also, I feel, because he was so obsessed with his in a good way, he was obsessed with his country, but that obsession nearly killed so many Jews, so many people. It actually so many people so created that and this are an obsession that some people till have. I don't get it. It's actually I wouldn't call it a yes, the word carries a lot of weight, but, for example, the pure genes or stuff like that. It's another way of saying like the class, class exactly like, for example, the Indians sub continent during the time of Krishna. Krishna, he used to identify as an Iran. That's why he's often considered as a supreme man, the ultimate form of man, and this entire continent of the AAR in race that is like stretching almost from Greece, like the Roman Empire, to almost all the people who say this country is they have are in all of them Arians. But you know what? You don't know, because I read history, I...

...read extensively on Arians or not, the are in race. You know what Arian race was. Basically they were illegitimate kids who carried seeds of Alexander. So they were pastards, exactly so, but people said Arizarans, but they don't know. In the literal sense they're all illegitimate race. That's an alleged gene that has been carried off, but it has been purified in a way precisely so it's represented fun for example, how heracules? You know it's not Hercules. It's heracules. Maybe it's not. I might be wrong. So, for example, he also hold around the entirety of exact that's what Alexander legitimate kids. And now those people are called, those people with those genes are called are ins because they associate like with the greatness of Alexander. But it's funny. It's really it is. I find it hilariously people talking. You know what this country, the people are are in exactly and like they everybody, like even our prime minister, that first two US. Sometimes it's a worth. That is the land of Oren. But you know what, the only are in surviving are in lay, near l not exactly in lake. There's a group of two villages and you need permission to enter those villages. You can't enter there and the town, even the village. In both the villages they never have into coast marriages. They're only marrying themselves to keep the gene pool and they still have their culture, attact called the old women. They dressed the old way and their features. They have those orangines, probably, but that is what the real right till now. Historically speaking, and so scientifically speaking, that is where the orangenes are still now, but very randomly everywhere, because it's like association. You haven't read much about exactly. I just want to put it out there. If you want to say that this country, of these people, that this is are in raised arens, please read about it, get into it and then say like, for...

...example, Arians are like settlers. How it becomes a fascist. Yeah, fascist, but the Arians were fast fascist because they did invade native lances and they casted out the people. They married into the cultures, diluted every never married. They didn't marry that much of the most of them, I mean they had kids, for example, from what it did when like the Greeks were invade, the Ardians were invading everywhere. But do you think the married region every woman that? No, no, no, of course they did not marry, but the Jeane got like mixed up, for example, the rabid the Indian Rabbitians and Rabbidians in North Indians. But it's a no, it's not just a north Indian that the arrangeans. A lot of travelers that went via the SEC rude. I think they also slip around with, of course, and that's why a lot of north Indians, they have different skin color exactly. But nobody will accept it. Nobody will nobody wants to say, okay, might might be pastors or because we like honestly, when it comes like India, I honestly feel like it first reveiddance over the negatives and like Jean's might be like somewhere from these bastardized people especially. So that's why they are in terms. I find it hilarious when people use it, of course, and like especially in such a way, like oh my heart. Anyway, continuing, we really did take a tangent. So Um, not God, okay, Panzaman, Panzaman, Oh you, not God, but a swastika, no black, no sky could squeak through every woman, a doze, a fascist, the boot in her face, the brute, the brute heart of a brute, like you. You stand at the blackboard, Daddy, in a picture. I have a few. A clift in your Chin instead of your foot, but no less of a devil for that. No, not any less the black man who bit my pretty red heart into...

...so obviously she's saying that. You know, again, the swastika symbolises how her father is like this opaque object of operation which can, which does not let any sky come through it. She lives in a shadow, and how, like this very fact of him made him eligible. Because, you know, every woman adors a fascist, the boat, the boot in the face, the brute. She is showing that. Alright, let's a hypocrisy. She actually sounds like Marianne, if you like, from normal people. Throw back to that episode, because she is accepting that women like being beat woven like these fascist bastards. And that's why you, like a brute, like you, survive this world and like even when she says a cleft in your Chin instead of your foot, it's like you know you your foot should have been on your face, because but it's not there. And but she also says that if your foot, wot would have been on if at, that might have made it look like the devil, but it's in me. For me, it is still you're still the devil. Yeah, and uh, and like pretty bit my pretty Red Heart in two. People say, broke my heart to toe my heart. It's interesting how you know if you bite something, it's deliberate. It's hateful to like bite into a child's heart if you so. Yeah, it's like she's a ten year old here and she had the next plain is. Actually, I was thin when they buried you. At Twenty, I tried to die and get back back back to you, and even I thought even the bones would do, but they pulled me out of the sack. This stuck me together with glue, and then I knew what to do. I made a model of you, a man in black with a mind main camp. Look so yet again. Now she says that she was twenty when she committed suicide to reunite with him, her father,...

...because the longing was still there because, like, maybe if they're buried together, maybe there's certain contact, certain touch. But those suicide attempt failed. They stuck her together with blue, which also shows that she never recovered from the trauma which made her wanting. I know she she applied. I'm not, sorry, applied, she committed, she tried to come with suicide many times. Yes, so I think when she died that was her third time, probably once when she was very small and second when she was in pretty something. So yeah, she has a history of depression, click depression, and it's this all just shows her her deteriorating mental state of mind. And so, yeah, and like, I made a model of you, a man in black with the main camp look. So now that is also very interesting. How now, this is, in my opinion, for lack of a bitter word, again, is the definition of her accepting that she has daddy issues, that she has made a model of him dressed like black leg. It's dark. She knows it's oppressive and wrong, but she has still given it a look too, margine, that she has a father complex. She has a father complex and odipus complex, right, or that is for the mother, for a girl. So it is Electra, Electrac it is called Electra. So yeah, and so, like I made a model of you, a man in black with a mind camp f look and a love of the rack and the screw. And I said, I do, I do. So, Daddy, I'm finally through the black telephones off at the route. The voices just can't warm through. If I've killed one man, I've killed too, the vampire who said he was you and drank my blood for a year, seven years. If you want to know, Daddy, you can lie back now. So it's like her husband is now that Hughes has not taken the position of like, you know, the black model...

...of the mind came flung, is now dead Hughes, and the vampire also, exactly, because he said that it's the father. And like if, in her mind, if she kills the vampire, she would kill the vampire and the model of a father, which she thinks the vampire is. So killing two words with the same with the same stone, kind of. And he drank her blood for seven years and like, which shows how horrid she marriage, exactly. And he had a lot of affairs. I Dead Hughes did have a face and he did cheat. And you know, the black telephones off at the route, the voices scant forms, which kind of sounds like now she doesn't miss her father with Tad Hughes, because he is being the toxic bastard in her life now. And and then he said, like Daddy, now you can chill like this. Dude is inflicting enough torture. And also it's like sad. But yeah, then she says there's a stake in your fat black heart. The villagers never liked you. They were dancing and stamping on you. They always knew it was you, Daddy, Daddy, you bastard. I'm through. So this is like, okay, you know what, I'm over you, and this is the reason why I'm over you. Like she's terribly trying to make a very aggressive image of her daddy being stomped on, like after his you know, Um, after his death years. I'm sorry to have got you. This just reminded me of via over time, but I'm let's complete and talk Um. So like this rem Um what some of my relatives. They were in a very, um, abusive household when she was married into the household. And the other fine day we were she just and you know, people end up talking about what abuse they've gone through, and so she said this. It was like I could...

...really I could understand what like the emotions. So she like in respect to her brother in law, she said that her child called me up to tell me that he's not in the best of health after twenty years, Al Right, not Fif Fifteen, twenty years, I'm not sure. And she said that the reply that I gave to that child was, well, I wish that your father dies and he dies horribly, because for the pain he has inflicted on me and my children. So she says that when she used to go out to work, she had to lock her children under five locks to make sure that they would be safe, and she could not feed them sometimes because like that was the kind of environment she and just for property exactly. And she said that I had my children living in impoverished conditions, despite having such abundance of money all around me, just because some people were like two huge in their head. And then her child had the audacity to contact me in this manner. So she's so she said this that the day of father dies, and I wish she dies horribly, I'll come to his burning body and I will feast on sweets on top of his dead body, because that would that's how happy his death, terrible death of his, would make me. So a lot of hatred, of course, in this and and how silver is like the village has never liked you. She knows that her father is a horrid man and despite being like in the dead, in the death pitch, she knows that the villagers know that he's dead him, they'll still stomp on him and dance and rejoice. So it kind of like, you know, this statement kind of run home on what she said about that, that I will eat sweets, I'll rejoice on your dead body. When you die, people really go through horrible hard times exactly, and they do develop hatred and they do. This reminds me of that Book Judy Obscure. Oh it's a very it's a very beautiful piece of literature, but it's really sad...

...ending the whole exactly. It's very sad. So, yeah, this was it, the poem, and I'm literally getting goose bumps when I read it. I was actually, Um, I think I have I wrote a poem on similar lines once upon a time. Yes, of course we can hear it, like, let this be a little bit of self promotion, of thoughts. Okay, so it's called how to kill, kill a man, okay, and it starts with how to kill him. Do you do you want to read it? I feel like you read things better. You sure. How to kill a man dead inside, he paints with pink. It is rosy and happy, contrary to how his brain lets him. He talks with people, he even laughs and pass a smile. But I loath this facade and his perfect self. So tell me. How can you kill a mandate inside? He just art skull. He's got a million tongues. However, still is a far from simple simplicity. He never plays or sings or does dance. He's often hiding in a corner dark begging for parts, a hug or two, maybe even a kiss. It can be from a crooked crow. Tell me how to kill a man dead inside. Do I bury him? Do I burn him or see his head with knives? No, maybe I can find Vermont to infest him from the inside, or wait till he trips over a bed of snakes and lies? Maybe, ever so simply, I let him be. I mean he is a man dead inside. Wow, it's beautiful. So, yeah, so, like you know, I just really I wouldn't dare compare myself to Sylvera Path, but you know how initially I was obsessed with killing the man in Indian. It's like he is dead inside. It's a very beautiful form. Well done much, thank you so yeah, that is that was daddy. It's a wrap on Daddy.

Yeah, and this was a heavy one. Yeah, I think this was quite a heavy topic to discuss on so many levels. So I liked it, you know, I woke me up, as I told you that. Yeah, very interesting. But it's funny how she killed herself also. Yes, she, I think, put her head in the oven and they yeah, but there are stories that I think there was female author, I think from Indian origin, who who killed herself but first killed her kid. She killed herself saying yeah, so that's even more freakish and that is not speaking. He's done. Give me that. Yeah, and he don't cond a lot of us to go about eating and like people in the kiding. So all right, that is it and we'll catch you later. Let's wrap. Thank you so much, listeners, for being so attentive towards that and supporting us this yeres and you've been wonderful to us and we hope you keep giving us your love and lessons. And Yeah, we'll reach out to you. We'll see you soon. See you soon.

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