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Tako Tako Talks
Tako Tako Talks

Season 1, Episode 2 · 4 months ago

#2 You get Dada, and you get Dada! -finger guns-

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Our second episode is about the thought provoking ideas and rudeness behind Dada and dadists culture in Art forms and writers like Tristan Tzara, Max Ernst, André Breton among others that emerged to rebel in the aftermath of the first World War. Wendiscover how the aftermath of the 1 st World War paved a way for surrealism and Cubism through Dadaism and how the artists and the writers and poets of this lost generation  expressed themselves more candidly. 

Hey, dear listeners, this is Skoy and this is easy. Welcome to and this is the podcast where we read, interpret dissect everything that can basically be read, interpreted or dissected. All Forms of art acceptable. And today we are a recording after a very long time. We were both traveling for a while, we were both on vacation and we're finally meeting after months, I think, a couple of months I believe, and now we have back to recording episodes back to back, such that we can give you good quality content forever. So what have you found for us to discuss today? Today I found so interesting thing. As the twenty year old, I was invited to give a guest lecture at a university and I was supposed to talk about art, because that's what I do, and my art in specific. So I ended up talking about data and so realism, okay, and diving into the history offer it, I discovered some really cool old Dada Ists, especially literal literature. You mean Olda is, because in Hindi Dada means also grandfather. Yeah, and in Russian it also means blabber. I was actually reading that there means different things in different languages and that's why Dada means nothing, and like you cannot say that in India, because Dada means everything expectable, head of the family exactly. So, yeah, so we're gonna be talking about the data manifesto today and in specific, the one written by a Christian Taza, and I hope that's the right way to pronounce it. He was, I believe, a corey, a Romanian, Iramanian French poet. Yes, a Romanian French poet, and why I am choosing him to like him as my main thing. It was Anton Burnett, who was the most important person in the other when actually, like you, bought it fourth and gave it refinement and made it into surrealists, actually started from I think zero,...

Switzerland, right, yes, as to the land, during the World War One, because the land was the only Um neutral country and this is where artists were able to grow. So I basically have um I called the one second yeah, I interpret data as the war nurtured form of Arts, a realism the war derived and everything that come after that was the war consequence art. It's very interesting because when, before World War One, all the poets and writers, they were the content of writing, content or manifest as always, was to pass or we need change, we need this the government. It's not happening. There was socialism, there was this, this, many things were happening and after the war, people, writers and people, they were in. They became very number. They didn't realize how big it was. It didn't expected to be so impactful and it was like lost. There were people were lost actually. So I think in a way a lot of movements, like Tadism, is all of these movements. They came and during the video this time period, you know, people were able to come out of it. Yes, and after the war, the war consequence, artwork and literature. It's called the new objectivity. That's how it grew out. Yeah, and its ideas like that. That's a realism, futurism, cubism, these were all being away from reality. New Objectivity, that is which came after the war, was focused on the most mundane parts of life and death, deaths, rather than non living, because the living was transient and the artists is supposed to make which is forever. So that the numbness came in after the wars. During the wars, I believe there was people were anything, but people didn't realize the magnitude of the war, that it would be so huge, and the impact and what hit them. And I suppose...

...it was a time of pandemic, like we are still going through the pandemic. So and I feel like the countries which were hit very strongly, such as Japan, still date their culture. Their literature is gloomy, really sad, gorry to an extent and something that hits you hard. Even their kids shows, such as the animis or something which the adults relate to. There's a certain reality of board inside. Their enemies are very um realistic and they're very they're not like cartoons for kids. Even the cartoons for kids, quote and quote, are very different. For example, I feel India as a nation wasn't that active in the nuclear war. First like, because we do. We did send a lot of battalion battalions with because we were under the east India company in the yeah, but I feel we weren't hit directly as Japan was, as France was, like there was no shilling on to India at that time. So I out of time. I feel that our artwork never was that impacted by the war personally as much as it was in the European and the Japanese side of the funny part is we had great painters like mfs and all, but they were not allowed to say in the country exactly how would the government and people they they sent them to exile. So how were supposed to how is art, the original out of our country, is supposed to bloom when people are not except exactly, which is very, Um, weird in sad also because we have some great artists. But our culture, there's so much of culture, variations and government and everything, all of these things together, it didn't provide the good environment for these artists to grow at that. But not things are changing. They have. We have become more like, despite a very authoritarian government, becoming more accepting to art culture. I feel there's like a certain sect that is becoming more except in the...

...other said, not that except excepting. I did I tell you I was almost about to work with the government and power right now in terms of art working, and I ended up refusing because they were not very respectful. Yes, I remember you were telling me about that. Yeah, so, while atwork is being more important, I feel the ruling the people and power still do not understand the proper concept of respecting the arts. Generation gap. I think from millennials there's still a bit more understanding. Yeah, they're more open minded. And from then I think gens isn't all. I think they are coming up with their own different kind of work, and there's the Sciet society and people are more connected around the world, so people are able to give explanation or justify what they're making, what art they're creating. So in a way it's been very helpful and that is why now people are becoming more accepting, I feel. Yeah, perhaps it is the internet which is making the world bit end goose at the same time. That's true. So anyway. Finally, that was a very long introduction in the same base. So coming back to the data Begifesto, the addiction, the language is very important for the time it was written. For example, the words he is using pharmaceutical product, bare like advertising the ardens. There I'll spring monetary system, Christo pluff Madonna. I don't know what that means, but it's very interesting the way he's used the language and to describe everything exactly. And I feel the reason that Christian Christian Faza ended up using words like these was too you know, when we talk about artists of the time, they tended to believe that they're higher than everybody else, they're bigger than everybody else. So maybe this was some somewhat on those lines, that he wanted to use such words, which the normal population wouldn't understand anyway, so that he feels that he gives the impression that he's bitten in them and thus they want to read the benefitts...

...of further, even if they're not interested in the topic he is talking about. You know, I feel a lot of the satire. I feel it's satirical. By that same time, I feel that this is also telling us, as Lee readers, that it also suggests changing times, that the century it is, that we're heading towards modernism. There's industrial revolution happening, there's a lot of change happening and a lot of change in the society and the kind of words that people are using. The culture is slowly shifting. So it's interesting what all you can grasp from a single text, exactly the words that the use. You can tell like, okay, this is the time, that is, this is the period that is, that is why they're using these are new words for them and this is how they're utilizing them in their text yeah, and another interesting thing for me was that, well, I'm going to read another extract of it, so it is under the main title that that means nothing. And it says some learner journalists regarded as an art for babies. Other holy Jesus calling the little children. Like holy Jesus calling the little children is a single word, as we do in like in the Modern Day texting of our day, as a relapse into a dry and noisy, noisy and monotonous primitive. Primitive, primitive with sensibility is not constructed on a Pieceis of a word. All Constructions, conversion, perfection, which is boring, the stagnant idea of gilded swamp, a relative human product. A Work of art should not be beauty in itself, for beauty stead it should neither be gay or sad, neither light nor dark, nor to rejoice or torture the individual by serving him the cakes of sacred orioles or the suite of a vaulted race through atmospheres. A work of Work of art is never beautiful by degree objectively and for all his criticism is useless. It exists only...

...subjectively for each man separately, without the slightest character of universality, which was Um, like this is some something somewhat interesting because, Um, before that there isn't. Before the modern era of artwork, paints were extremely expensive to come across and you needed the endorsement of the monarchy or the church to paint what you need to paint. Thus you painted everything religious, just Jesus, calling the little children vibes and Dada. Just about twenty years ago paints became cheaper because they started manufacturing them synthetically with like titanium dioxide, Mass Brown or whatever chromium was. There was a huge shift, huge shift, because it became cheaper to paint. And so that's why he's like, all right, art and this is something really cool because, you know, um, recently I was not feeling very pretty about myself for some beatrix that I have no clue. But great, but, you know, still on the inside, and there was a certain Cote which kept on coming into me. It's a very popular one. I believe it's from a popular Hollywood actress who said that I look like art. Art Is Not supposed to look beautiful, it is supposed to make you feel emotions. What always said that's yeah, and that is why, that is what I was telling myself when I looked in the mirror and felt ugly. I was like, well, honey, your art, that is not supposed to be beautiful, it is supposed to make you feel things. And so, yeah, so that's why I found this was very interesting. And, Um, you know, it was at this time that artworks having emotions and artwork became important, because before this there was only the romantic supert emotions and artwork. That's true, and people hated the Romantics. They still do to an extent, because they cannot understand them. They never really empathized, unlike Romantics. I think Dada, because Romantics always used...

...beautiful words. Yeah, I don't think data, like the sound poetry. They use beautiful words, they just use words, sex strong words like scribble, juggular words, like like jumble words, and they put together and they use it in that way. So that way it is also pretty different. It is, it is, it is, and it's raw, emotional. It's Um, like. Maybe we'll do another episode where then I'm going to talk about some different exhibition by the others and in that we will discover that they m I'm not any you know, bad telling of common like a vamp of wives, is what the data's word. They used to create trouble for the sake of creating trouble and chaotic they were chaotic, and I love that. For Them I kind of Um related to this word organized chaos. So not a lot of people like it, but a lot of people, I feel, like it also at the same time. For example, I know people are on me are very particular about their things and they want things in a certain way, a little sis maybe, but I like also things in a particular way, but at the same time sometimes I think that a little bit of organized yours is needed better. It makes things more person because, like, if you come into my room, you know it's always a mess, but it's a mess in a way that I have. You know where the messages and there is a few extracts that I liked about the Englaction to data. So it goes like we have enough for cubists and futurist academics, laboratories of formal ideas. Is the aim of art to make money in Cajole, the Nice Bourga rhyme ring with the essence of the currencies and inflection slips along the line of belly in profile. Cubism was born out of the simple way of looking at an object. So they painted a cup twenty centimeters below...

...his eyes. The Cubans look at it from above, are this complicate appearance by making a perpendicular section and arranging it con sistlessly on the side. So this is I find this example very interesting. Do with it. Yes, and you know what's even more interesting is that at this time they how he talks about cubism, and there was another I don't remember. He also writes we do not need any more futurists. Are Cubas at that time anymore? So it's very interesting how, while he appreciates the Cubas, he is also a little like, alright, adbonishing them a little. Yes, he's like, alright, that's enough, now go back into your hole. And so I kind of like cubism for some reason. Have you seen this painting where the time is, uh Um, flowing like a river? I think it's about Michaelangelo or what? It's a cubist form of painting where the time is flowing, there's a clock and it is like grimming, like water. It is flowing like what I believe that would be a surrealistic data from Sabad or Sabador Dali. And you know what was the most interesting part? Ever since I was a kid, when the word Cube Ist was one I thought it was because it looked like cubes everywhere. And you're reading this. It was very interesting to know it was born out of a symbol, simple way of looking at an object and putting all multiple different sites and proportions of the object into well, what you see in front of you. So yes, we confirmed that painting is the memory, the persistence of my memory by Salvador Dali, and I find it's very beautiful. I think it's a very different concept and I'm sure a lot of painters and people must have rejected it initially. Of course. That's Um so dada was the like the Indian Dada of surrealism.

And so how that, I was very, how do I say it? Just cut things out right. certalism was more was the same exact thing, just better structured, formed in literary literally, so it was easier for people to Digest, to Digest. So that was the only difference between both of them. Maybe that is a little more Cutturat, a little more cut throat and it does not care if people understand it or not. So yeah, and like, and I've highlighted this another line. So when it comes to sterilism, the psychology part, in the analysis part, the symbolism part, is extremely important, while in that the Christian says psychoanalysis is a dangerous disease. It puts to sleep the anti objective impulses of man and systematizes the Burgas, which is very interesting because you know, when we make artwork it or was this your line? I've forgotten. Okay, so Um, so this was. This is interesting and that since because you know, he says anti objective as the new edge people call it, unconditionally. So yes, it was interesting. How that it just rejects, like rejects psycho psychoanalysis, because it essentially finds reasons behind your emotions, and that is all of it. Where you feel it. So you express it. If you feel it, feel it. It's valid, and things like those. I think we're very front of his time and very straightforward and way forward exactly and being very on the face precisely. And now we live in a generation we say the exact same things, but more twitter quoted, more tripped in sugar talking about love and life, because he did not think there was any love or hate. He just said it is, it is, art is, art is what it is. This is what it is. That's how it is exactly. And now we just call it love and ununtional in forgiveness and whatever else...

...can you say, like, for example, the sky is pink, so it does pink. So it does pink. Yeah, yeah, that's it. Um and and serialism. Actually, it was a sky is orange. Yeah, that makes sense. That makes like in French it's it's an actual proverb that you feel what you feel. I read about this. So they used to say the sky is orange, let's and it was interesting in its own sense. So there's another extractor which I really liked. It talks about art. How the dad is they see art, they perceive it. They say art afflicts no one in those who manage to take an interest in it will harvest arrests and a fine opportunity to populate the country with their conversation. Art Is private affair. The artist produces it for himself. Intelligible work is the product of journalists and because at this moment it strikes my fancy to combine this monstrosity with oil paints, a paper tube stimulating the metal that is automatically pressed and poured hatred. Carbatis villany. The language again, it's very different, the way he's using examples, for example, he's using the way he's used the oil paints. It's it's it's very different to the expression is very different and it um it feels world like, does it not? Because it is being brewed and water. This is like a work through douct like war nurtured artwork and thoughtful thoughts, if you see so. The violence of the war seems to have perpetrated into the artists and how they're expressing themselves. And the other thing I feel is, since this would have originally been written in French and this is the English translation, the French might be called the most romantic language, but the word love is the least used. Really, Um not, I wouldn't say least you. So them in French can be transfer...

...not translated equivalent to I love you, but literally translated. It means I like you. They're normally people do not say I love you. Two people. Literally Trans they all this. I like you two people. All right, that's very interesting. Yeah, and like because French, what I've always felt, is very raw. It has those specific words how the Old Shakespeare in texts used to be. They specifically expressive. But I find the language also addiction. What's very raw in exactly the words are very rang, very focused exactly to one specific point in yes, exact in nature. And when you were reading it I was actually translating some of it to French in my head, and that's where I realized that in French this is normal. In English we are not there used to reading a text and sentences put together like this, precisely, and yes, and there's a next paragraph in this. So it goes like. Logic is a complication. Logic is always wrong. It draws the threat of notions, words in their formal exterior, towards illusionary ends. In Center it kills chain. It is an enormous centerpedes to fling. Independence, married to logic, art would live in insist swallowing, engulfing its own tail, still a part of its own body, fornicating within itself, and the passion would become a nightmare, tart with Protestinism, Mon Monument, a heap of ponderous gray entrails. You know what I really like this events. Logic, marriage, logic, art would live in incest. Exactly that. That is true. I mean if there's a lot of logic and that it will be more like an architectural drawing of it will be an architectural structure, sure of, or painting or something. It will be very architectural in nature, and that's what that will not be fun. Maybe to other...

...architects, yes, but it won't be fun to see or Emilienate or experience. It would be too regulated. And you know, Um, it also reminds me of an Arab Rus and how the older and basically all religious stories working because, like if you read the Great War story, it's like all about insisting them happening within themselves because logically, gods are better than human beings. It can't get I can, I think we can again use the word or organized cires and exactly a special extract for it, like organized skills. Does make more sense than logical? Yeah, it does. and Um, for some weird reason I, after reading the data Benifesto, after reading other Dada is things, we are also going to read a couple of poems from them, I've started feeling happier than before for some weird reason, while I don't know, that speaks to you, that that speaks to me. That does nothing. I am nothing. Data is that is exactly. I just reason eat with the anti human and Gulf that Dada creates. How it is like raw in nature, because a lot of things. When I talk to people about unconditionality a few times, especially in college, Um, I don't. I just don't. Not. If I don't feel like talking to somebody, I will not pick up their call, you know, more than raw. I find it more candid, candidate draw and it's truthful to your own self. It is the ugly truth. It's like the ugly truthe. I wouldn't call it ugly, I would just truth. An expression. Maybe the other people. Yeah, do not. For me, if as like Saras is, it's it just is. Yeah, and you don't quantify it with good, bad, evil, wrong. It's it just is. So let it freaking be. Yeah. So there's another very important thing with that is it's morality, and on this e please read this one. Morality has a determined charity and pity to walls of fat that have grown like elephants, like...

...her planets, and are called good there's nothing good about them. Goodness is lucid, Claire and decided, pitiless towards compromise and politics. Morality is an injection of chocolate into veins of all men. Language again, it's beautiful, I'm sure in friendship sounds a thousand times better. This task is not ordered by a supernatural force, but by the trust of idea brokers and grasping academicians exactly. And there's actually another part of sentimentality which we did not mark. It's actually good sentimentality. At the site of a group of men quarreling and board, they invented the calendar and the medicament wisdom. With sticking labels, labels, the battles of philosophers were set off. Um What is, how will I spell this word? Mayor Cantilus, scales, medicals and petty measures. For the second time it was understood that t is a sentiment like diarrhea in relation to the disgust that destroys hild a foul attempt by carrion corpses to compromise the sun. I proclaim the opposition of all cosmic faculties to this Gonera of Putrid Sun issued from the factories of philosophical thought and I proclaimed the bitter struggle of all weapons off interesting statist discussed right. It's very good, just description and with Diarrhya and weapons and of coss difficulties of and all of that. But in a way it makes sense. It's it's very satire and I was being very satirical move. I feel he's become truth. He's saying the truth and as he sees it, without design, without you know, flaring it up, he's just how is sentimentality? How does it come into it and how is it related to it? I'm not why? Sure, yeah,...

I feel because initially he talked about charity pity, morality and charity pity being the two grown elephants who have not become plans. So Um, because charity and pity are both. Because we become sentimental about things, ego comes into being, thus creating the war. Why squirreling men and people? But why only men? Why do they always only be refer to quarreling men? I thought women called more, but in texts they whenever used patriarchy, as women are always scorning, but here, because it's a text, they have to mention men exactly, and so I suppose that is also failed for women embomment in a way. Then they did like from what I could see, Um, not a lot of women were that, but there were a few. There were a few, and the ones which were became very notable and very loud in nature. So we love that, we love those women. Um. But yeah, and it's it's just so raw and it's disgusting to read that. I love it. And that's it when it comes to data. And the last one. So this is the and this is where I fell in love with Dada. So he defines that as nothing. The disgust of data is because Dada is the abolition, I read the other abolition of memory. Dada abolition of archaeology. That the abolition of profits, that the abolition of the future, that the absolute and absolute and unquestionable faith in every God. That is the immediate product of spontaneity. Data, elegant and prejudiced leap from harmony to others, fair trajectory of a word toss play, a screeching phonograph record to respect all individuals. In the folly of the movement, where it be serious, fearful, Timid Adrian figure is determined enthusiastic. So you can read, I can read, and this is, you know how...

...beautiful with such a world be. So, basically, that is the present continuous. It is the present, yea, it is the present continuous. Add and what you're feeling presently, continuously. That is. Otherwise it is nothing. Otherwise it is nothing. And if you're to ponder too much over your thoughts and not create art out of it, will you're putred. You're gonna Rund Clement or whatever. It's a good way to live. Also, it's a very live in the present. But like more than living in the present, it is being the present, being the present, yes, and like why? That is as artists they do reflect. They make present from past and past from future, and it's it's a very mixed up con like you know, I am not sure, no way now understand. That is why that is nothing. Yeah, exactly, because it falls within itself in the end. That's why they say it's nothing. That is that is everything, and then nothing, exacting and everything. I agree to disagree, disagree to agree. And because you know what that line is. Um, I think, therefore, I am it is something as vague and as specific as that, and the last line of the manifesto. That is freedom, Da Dada, Dada, a roaring of tense color and interlacing of opposites, of all contradictions, gratis and inconsistencies, colon life, life, and that's where that what Dada is. It is and I actually have good goose bombs. What interesting reading. What are interesting synopsis in the world that we have come at the end exactly, and from Reading Dada ISM and like about other forms of artwork and more. The one thing that I was able to realize is that I never really want to read another self help book. I want to read more about these artists who have lived these putrid cornera likely lives and experienced...

...my life, perhaps through their lenses in a way, because I don't know, it just feels more intimate to be angry than to be hopeful about the world, and you're angry on the things that you love. That's being at the other list. Okay, so I found some female other writers, Sophie Tober, Emmy hennings and who a Mina Loy. We know Benwich village clarity, then Baroness Sa want way. I can't pronounce more than that and I don't know how you pronounce it Juliete Wash Suzanne Dun champed like quite. If you actually they are actually, then in the books that I read about, that isn't they were not spoken about. That was only the men. Yeah, the patriarchy. Al Right, that does mark the end of this rather interesting episode. EADIE has gone to take care of certain things, so I will be endering it all on my own accord. So thank you so much to your listeners for listening to us. We will be giving out more episodes and we'll talk to you soon. Reach out to us in whatever way you feel comfortable. Me last talk to us. We would love to hear more about you. Tell us if you want to hear more about Dather and the and the Dad Sports, because will that deserve another episode and we might as well give them one. All right, bye, bye, alligate horse.

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